12 Tips for Zero Waste Shopping

12 tips for zero waste shopping.pngWhen I go to the supermarket I always see people loading their shopping carts with endless plastic bags, filled with plastic packaged foods. In shopping centers people carry around numerous plastic bags from the stores they have purchased endless stuff. It makes me so sad to see that people either don’t care, don’t know or are lazy in regards to plastic wastage. This plastic cannot be recycled, it doesn’t break down and put simply is catastrophic for our planet.

Don’t be discouraged and in no way am I saying I am the most eco-friendly zero waste minimalist out there but the point is that you (and I) continue to strive to implement changes that will benefit everything and everyone.

There are numerous ideas, tips and tricks that you can implement into your life that will reduce your impact on the planet and rid you of plastic wastage.

  • Stop using plastic bags. Seriously. Reusable bags are avaliable everywhere so there are no excuses.
  • Buy package free vegetables from the supermarket or farmers market.
  • Go to bulk food stores and bring your own containers.
  • Buy items in recycled paper instead of plastic.
  • Buy items you can’t get without plastic in bulk.
  • Check online for environmentally conscious companies that utilise paper or minimal plastic wrapping.
  • When getting takeaway, bring your own containers.
  • When getting drinks, bring your own cup.
  • Carry your own set of reusable cutlery and straw.
  • Say no to receipts.
  • Choose quality and longevity over something that was $50 cheaper but will last a mere 6 months.
  • Choose second hand, scope out websites like Gumtree and Ebay as well as op shops like Vinnies for some great bargain steals.

The power is in your hand. As consumers, we have the power to create change. By not purchasing plastic coated things, we reduce the demand for such products and in turn demand far more ecofriendly alternatives.

This also relates to minimalism and general awareness regarding purchasing “stuff” but the ultimate way to avoid plastic waste is to not buy it and in turn you will most likely not be buying random stuff that will clutter your house and your mind.

An example of this might be you want some cute decor for your room, but its covered with plastic wrapping – you choose not to buy it and later realise it would have probably been thrown out on the bin a few months later. You realise you didn’t actually need it, instead you almost gave in to a quick impulse buy. You are still just as happy as before and begin to recognise the benefits of having less “stuff”. Here my friends is the beautiful correlation between zero waste, minimalism and living an ecofriendly life.

Thank you so much for reading.

I would love to read your comments regarding your best tip for zero waste shopping!

Courtney!

Follow me on Instagram here!

Advertisements

33 Comments Add yours

  1. ktkickass says:

    Love this article! Thank you for writing it. I do try to minimalize my bag usage by taking my own material bags grocery shopping, and I love going 2nd hand shopping! The plastic containers that I do then have, I give to the high school for their cooking class so the kids can take their baked goods home. I hope that they are recycling the plastic containers! Hugs, kt

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Courtney says:

      Thanks so much for reading! Its wonderful to hear that like minded people are out there making a change.

      Like

  2. We have to pay for plastic shopping bags in Ireland. Most people Grumbled during the transition but now everyone brings their own bags and boxes. 😊😊😊

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Courtney says:

      Wow – thats amazing! They have finally decided to ban plastic bags in Australia but the change will take place in a few years, nonetheless a step in the right path! Thanks for the comment.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. It’s good to hear of positive changes in the world. 😊

        Liked by 1 person

    2. Kirsty says:

      We have to pay for plastic bags in the UK and in Finland 🙂 Like you said everyone grumbled at first but now it’s much better. Also a lot of the clothes I buy are second hand, and if you’re prepared to do a bit more searching you can find some great bargains! 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

      1. We had very few seconds hand shops here until the Celtic Tiger ended. Thankfully we have some great ones now. 😊

        Liked by 2 people

  3. Courtney says:

    Thats great to hear…I’m glad Australia has finally joined the bandwagon, about time! I always love rummaging through op shops trying to find a good gem!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. theethicalearthling says:

    nice post! my new years resolution this year is to create less waste, it seems like an extremely daunting task when you think about almost everything at grocery stores or target or where ever come in plastic packaging, but a little extra effort on everyone’s part could send a big message to the companies that make and package the products. Thanks for the tips and thanks for bringing attention to such an important issue!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Courtney says:

      Mine new years resolution is also that! Although I do strive to reduce my waste, there is always room for improvement and by no means am I close to producing ‘zero’ waste, but it is definitely important we all aim to make a difference every day.
      Thanks for commenting 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  5. A Little Slice of Clementine says:

    Great article! I strive to be zero waste and do the best I can in the small college town I live in. It definitely is easier to be zero waste when you live in a more populated area, but I agree that there is no excuse for using plastic bags. It always baffles me why people use them, I wish they would make you ask for plastic and instead automatically give people paper.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Courtney says:

      Totally agree! Were I work we don’t give out paper bags unless people ask, most people don’t mind carrying it or putting it in their own bag. Thanks for commenting. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  6. barbarablunt says:

    Great list! Here’s to a new year and more opportunities to live the friendly way!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Courtney says:

      Thanks for commenting! 🙂 Glad you liked it.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. afarmingartist says:

    Courtney I love this post! Great tips that seem normal to us and strange to others. Look for my future post on the same topic. Happy Green Year!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Courtney says:

      Thanks! I’ll have to check it out. 🙂

      Like

  8. House Of Eco says:

    Thank you for the list! Here in the UK the plastic carrier bag argument seems to be won – hurray! But it’s unheard of to bring your own bags for produce… even for people who know they should do something about (and I promise I will now).

    The item ‘say no to receipts’, isn’t that more about saving paper than plastic?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Courtney says:

      Thanks for commenting! Many people here still use plastic bags for produce but the best way to get the message out is to lead by example…lots of people ask about my produce bags at the shops. In regards to receipts – yes they are paper, but any way we can reduce waste (including recyclable waste) is great! 🙂

      Like

  9. I would like to add dumpster diving to your list :). Great post.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Courtney says:

      Awesome idea! 🙂

      Like

  10. jessiemontes says:

    Thank you for posting this! Since I have discovered minimalism, I have become much more aware of these things. I was actually thinking about how I need to purchase a few reusable bags as I was going through my garage and found a huge bag FULL of plastic bags. What a waste and you can’t even recycle them. Can’t wait to read more of your blogs!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Courtney says:

      Thanks for commenting! Glad you enjoyed this post.
      Many supermarkets sell their own brand of reusable bags which are usually much cheaper than other brands of bags. Here in Australia you can take soft plastics to the supermarket and they use them to make bench seats…but of course, not using them in the first place is best! 🙂

      Like

  11. Della Dam says:

    “The power is in our hands” YES!!:)

    Like

  12. Love this!
    For any UK readers please sign and share this to reduce waste in the UK!
    https://petition.parliament.uk/petitions/178676

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Lydia Barnes says:

    Well said! Am also trying to reduce my waste, especially plastic consumption. However, being a student (in the UK), it seems really difficult to find places to buy things in bulk, and all of the cheaper supermarkets wrap everything in so much unnecessary plastic. 😦

    Liked by 1 person

  14. luvernehoover says:

    Courtney – I am totally on board with everything you support. I have one question for you, though. How do you dispose of your trash? We use grocery store plastic bags to line our kitchen and bathroom trash. I take cloth bags to the grocery store until I am low on trash can liners. If I didn’t use these bags, I would have to BUY plastic bags.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Courtney says:

      Very true! It is quite a struggle between the two options! We also sometimes use grocery bags but because we rarely get them from the shops we do rely on buying large trash bags…in the future I would like to fully reduce my waste as to avoid this but in my current situation living with my family this is impossible. Thanks for raising the issue!

      Like

  15. A.D!! says:

    Thanks for the tips 🙂 I’m going to try and implement things slowly. For now going to first stop buying plastic water bottles. That’s a constant in our house and the biggest cause for waste.
    Looking forward to reading more such interesting articles.

    Love,
    Aditi.
    https://nomadfashionista.wordpress.com

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Courtney says:

      That is so awesome to hear! Resusable water bottles are the way to go.

      Liked by 1 person

  16. Kate says:

    Ah, a kindred spirit! I’m so glad I found this post & your blog. This has been a major thing I’ve been working on this year, and now take great pride in the very limited amount of packaging that comes into my home. Thanks for sharing and encouraging others in ways they can lead a more intentional, less wasteful life.

    Like

  17. Great article! I started making cutbacks so I could afford reusable items and eliminate chemicals. Now I save tons of money and the environment, along with my health. I don’t use more than a microcloth and water for most things. I bought reusable grocery and produce bags, metal straws, ect. Little by little it pays off in so many ways. I could never go back. Thanks for sharing!

    Like

  18. Such an useful and detailed article. 😊 Awfully hope the concept of zero waste could swirl up as famously as it did in Europe. By the way, my blog recently wrote a series of feature news about the zero waste issue. Welcome to visit my blog👉 http://wp.me/p8ER0M-c1 🌟

    Like

  19. C. Mitchell says:

    I used to think it was so hard to be zero waste, but the more you do it the more you get used to it!

    Like

Leave a Reply to barbarablunt Cancel reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s